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20110709
20110709
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
obama announced plans to start bringing down the number of u.s. troops in afghanistan. but still, u.s. troops are going to be there for years to come. come fall, it's going to be a full decade we've been at war. so this weekend next, a closer look at an aspect that's easy to forget, easy to miss, at least until your life is on the line. i'm talking about the impact this war has had on medical care not just for wounded troops but also right here at home. one pretty stark example is the care that saved the life of congresswoman gab write yell giffords, a bullet through the head. the kind of wound you might see in combat. dr. peter ri was running the emergency room that day but he learned his trade in iraq, with the navy me says with a wound like giffords had a decade ago a lot of doctors would have given up before they even started. >> for most handgun injuries through and to the head, the chance of them going to the operating room were exceedingly low. but nowadays now that we have experience from penetrating trauma from the recent iraq experience, we were aggressive about getting to
because of iraq and afghanistan those views are shifting. that invisible wounds, mental wounds, psychological wounds, are just as debilitating and in some cases more debilitating than losing a arm or leg. gwen: what is it about these wars that's different from other wars in changing people's opinions about that? >> part of it is the sheer number of tours. you have people going three, four, five, six times to these war zones. and part of the nature of the war itself. in world war ii, you had big battles where the guys to your left and right of you were shooting at enemies. and it was more of a conventional fight. in iraq and afghanistan, you could be walking as has been the case where i've been there, and a person who's a friend of yours suddenly disappears in an i.e.d. you never see the enemy who took his life. a very different kind of challenge. you are constantly afraid of something bad happening. and you never know who the person is who's doing that bad thing to you or the person you care about. >> yochi, does the policy change affect benefits in a way that needed some deep
personal struggles. >>> the new secretary of defense in afghanistan with a striking new assessment of al qaeda. >>> final edition for a tabloid caught up in its own scandal. is there more to come? >>> and royal treatment. will and kate bring their charming style to the u.s. carrying on a long family tradition. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. betty ford, a former dancer, stay-at-home mom of four, and wife of a michigan congressman, never could have imaged the strange circumstances that in 1974 would land her and her husband, gerald ford, into the white house, but for a role she was unprepared for, first lady of the united states, she made a lot of it and changed thousands if not millions of lives in the process. betty ford died last night in california at the age of 93. she was known for speaking her mind, even when it didn't jive with her husband's political agenda, but she is best remembered for putting a public face to some awfully personal struggles and inspiring americans, particularly women, in ways no other first lady had. >>> at the ford museum in g
have expanded radically with involvement in afghanistan and iraq. as we will hear, the u.s. as crated a police force in iraq that may number as many as 400,000 personnel. the goal of the u.s.-led nato training effort is at 157,000 police and the cost of this training program to the u.s. alone is about $1 billion per month. today, police assistance programs in the government are in multibillion-dollar effort led by the departments of defense and the department state but involving a number of other federal agencies. as programs have grown in size and cost, they also grow in kind. as you saw from the exhibition here on the screen, policing around the world is heavily impacted by history, culture, legal systems, and level of development. police forces differ markedly, so do they differ by agency and the country in which they work in. today, we have assembled a panel of very distinguished experts to discuss the various approaches that the u.s. government takes towards police training in foreign countries. you have the bad reviews for our speakers, so i will not do that. the speakers will c
invasion of afghanistan which read mights the cold war period and makes the importance of the national security as ever more important for the american public. you've got economic issues at home that certainly dhaka people's perceptions of the administration as well as the ability of the government to finance the things it would like to do. all of those things and many more influence various policies of the carter administration so it's my pleasure to ask art morrissey to the podium. he served in the of science and technology during the carter administration when he developed decision memoranda for the president on many national security issues including space policy and export controls. art? >> thank you. it's interesting to be here. thank you for the introduction to the prison the carter of fenestration space policy in the evolution of the space policy making. i want to thank the stand enterprise institute and marshall institute of the council on the institute for sponsoring this he said. as i look over the audience, it's interesting to see a multi generation of people that i've work
trove of documents that have been released in the last year. the iraq war logs, the afghanistan war logs, and what has been called cablegate, as the u.s. state department documents that are continuing to be released. why does it matter so much? we will talk about that this afternoon, but let's just take one example that came out in the iraq war logs. february 2007. the war log show that to give you zero men were standing, iraqis under an apache helicopter. the men have their hands up. they clearly are attempting to surrender. the apache helicopter can see this. so they are not wrote. the soldiers called back to the base and asked what they should do. the lawyer in the bass says you cannot surrender to a helicopter, and they blow the man attempting to surrender away. that was february 2007. now, we will fast forward to july 12, 2007. video that has been released by wikileaks. this devastating video of an area of baghdad where a group of men were showing around two reuters journalists. one was an up-and-coming videographer, and one was this driver. he was 40 years old, father of four. they
withdrawal of troops in afghanistan is not something you share with the taliban. they don't have watches but do have calendars. they know what the implications are. he's made monumental errors internationally and errors defensively. and up to a prem p premise. >> sean: you say in the beginning he focused on the wrong things. you said from the time he took office he focused on the wrong things. if you were elected in 2008, and had been elected and saying the worst economy since the great depression what would you have done? >> well, his first job had to be to get this economy going. and had to stop the decline and that is what the first job should have been. he delegated it over to nancy pelosi and harry read. they cracked a new spending program protecting union jobs for government owe workers but didn't create the kind of opportunities needed in the private sector. then, he went to obama care, cap and trade, and card checks, stacking national labor relations board. one thing after another. liberal agenda he'd been pining for for years, he put in place. and the impact could have been pred
or afghanistan and murdock would not have tolerated it. i'm afraid that -- >> i'm soer are. i when you think about what was done and the despicable things done, do you think he made the right call of just canceling it? it's done? >> it's a very difficult call because it's a very old historic paper which has a very great history, though it has committed abuses in the past like all tabloids do, but it's also exposed a lot of fraud and misdeeds, most recently it exposed corruption in the pakistani cricket team which was an important story. it's very sad. it's sad for also for the 200 people who work there, frightful for them. many of them will be given jobs in other news of murdock's papers in london. and he probably will have a new sunday paper calling "the sun" on paper to go along with the daily paper in britain. >> some were wondering, i was reading a lot of articles on this, if rupert murdock was at all responsible, maybe in a trickle down effect of kind of creating an atmosphere where people will be willing to do anything to get that story. who creates that atmosphere there? >> i think al
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)